Growth Charts - 2000 CDC Growth Charts - United States

Generate a growth chart to calculate your child's height and weight percentile

Health o meter Grow with Me 2-in-1 Baby to Toddler Scale with Growth Chart Book

$119.99
  • Review
  • TAG : MedCalc: Interactive Growth Charts: Front Page
ADD TO CART
  • The 2000 CDC Growth Chart reference population includes data for both formula-fed and breast-fed infants, proportional to the distribution of breast- and formula-fed infants in the population. During the past two decades, approximately one-half of all infants in the United States received some breast milk and approximately one-third were breast-fed for 3 months or more. A Working Group of the World Health Organization is collecting data at seven international study centers to develop a new set of international growth charts for infants and preschoolers through age 5 years. These charts will be based on the growth of exclusively or predominantly breast-fed children.

    To download PDFs of growth CHARTS without the large gender labels:



    Literature:
    A free copy of the development ARTICLE for the 2013 growth chart can be found online at:
    URL:
    Reference:
    Fenton R Tanis, Kim H Jae. A systematic review and meta-analysis to revise the Fenton growth chart for preterm infants. BMC Pediatrics.2013, 13:59

  • The 2000 CDC Growth Chart reference population includes data for both formula-fed and breast-fed infants, proportional to the distribution of breast- and formula-fed infants in the population. During the past two decades, approximately one-half of all infants in the United States received some breast milk and approximately one-third were breast-fed for 3 months or more. A Working Group of the World Health Organization is collecting data at seven international study centers to develop a new set of international growth charts for infants and preschoolers through age 5 years. These charts will be based on the growth of exclusively or predominantly breast-fed children.

    “The Fenton growth chart for preterm infants has been revised to accommodate the World Health Organization Growth Standard and reflect actual age instead of completed weeks, in order to improve preterm infant growth monitoring.”
    Editor, BMC Pediatrics

    The US Centers for Disease Control revised their standard growth charts in 2000, based upon more recent data which are “representative of the United States population, reflecting the Nation’s cultural and racial diversity.”

    Per the CDC Growth Chart FAQ:
    Are these charts appropriate for exclusively breast-fed babies?
    The 2000 CDC growth charts can be used to assess the growth of exclusively breast-fed infants, however when interpreting the growth pattern one must take into account that mode of infant feeding can influence infant growth. In general, exclusively breast-fed infants tend to gain weight more rapidly in the first 2 to 3 months. From 6 to 12 months breast-fed infants tend to weigh less than formula-fed infants.

    The 2000 CDC Growth Chart reference population includes data for both formula-fed and breast-fed infants, proportional to the distribution of breast- and formula-fed infants in the population. During the past two decades, approximately one-half of all infants in the United States received some breast milk and approximately one-third were breast-fed for 3 months or more. A Working Group of the World Health Organization is collecting data at seven international study centers to develop a new set of international growth charts for infants and preschoolers through age 5 years. These charts will be based on the growth of exclusively or predominantly breast-fed children.

    The 1977 growth charts for babies under 2 years old were based on a study conducted in Ohio from 1929 to 1975. The babies in this study:

    • were primarily fed formula or a combination of breastmilk and formula
    • often started solids before 4 months

    As a result, the 1977 growth charts are not a reliable indicator of the growth of children who:

    • are breastfed only
    • delay solids until around six months, as is now recommended by many health organizations

  • The 2000 CDC Growth Chart reference population includes data for both formula-fed and breast-fed infants, proportional to the distribution of breast- and formula-fed infants in the population. During the past two decades, approximately one-half of all infants in the United States received some breast milk and approximately one-third were breast-fed for 3 months or more. A Working Group of the World Health Organization is collecting data at seven international study centers to develop a new set of international growth charts for infants and preschoolers through age 5 years. These charts will be based on the growth of exclusively or predominantly breast-fed children.

WHO | The WHO Child Growth Standards

Girls and boys grow in different patterns and at different rates. So, girls and boys are measured on different growth charts. Also, the growth charts of infant and children are different. In this article, you can find the growth chart for infants. Sometimes, special growth charts are also used for children who have certain conditions, such as Down syndrome.